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Grin

Grin is a privacy focused cryptocurrency that implements the MimbleWimble protocol.

Privacy coin

🔑 63%

Reviews for Grin

🔑 5 positive | 💩 3 negative

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One thing that’s interesting is that unlike Bitcoin, which was so maligned and ignored at launch that Satoshi had to mine by himself on a single Intel CPU for most of 2009, there is (by our conservative estimates) $100 million of mostly VC money invested into special-purpose investment vehicles to mine Grin. This does a lot of weird things: It turns a bunch of people who would have been buyers of Grin into sellers of it, it changes the composition of the early holder roster, and it means the chain will launch with an extremely high degree of security via high PoW hashrate.

Despite the big amount of professional investor interest in Grin, the community itself is the closest thing I’ve seen to how the early Bitcoin community felt. The lack of a premine does magic things to human psychology; when you are doing free work for something that someone else gave themselves a huge bag of, you feel like a chump! When you do free work for something that everyone has a fair chance to mine, you feel like you’re part of a tribe, and that effect is in full swing with Grin. Wallets, decentralized exchanges, stats pages, etc., are all popping up, and our Grin community channel has smart devs asking what they can build every day.

2019-01-14 | Full Review

💩

I don’t see how Grin can win if it’s not differentiated enough from Monero (both tech and community). Open to be proven wrong.

2018-01-16 | Full Review

💩

What makes Grin dangerous is that it does have a compelling story and people might think that translates into value for the coin. The user experience is shitty. To get even remotely close to Lightning, it would need years of work [and] hundreds of devs. It won't be used [in] real life.

2019-01-15 | Full Review

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If I were doing it all over again (like Grin is), I would probably choose just a fixed inflation rate, i.e., 1 ZEC per block from the genesis block until the end time. Grin has chosen that, and I'm envious of the simplicity.

2018-12-02 | Full Review

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If grin is successful, it will be linearly inflationary and disempowered in a few key aspects. Imagine: Monero = crypto Swiss bank; Grin = confidential emailable cash transactions.

Nic Carter, Partner at Castle Island Ventures and Co-creator of Coinmetrics

2018-01-10 | Full Review

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I love the Grin developers and fully applaud what they’re doing, but let’s not overstate claims as to privacy. MWs primary goal is scalability, not non-interactive privacy.

2018-02-15 | Full Review

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Imagine what a universally accessible, private, scalable and fungible digital coin could do. Since Grin’s introduction, its developers have enabled capabilities such as Lightning, Schnorr signatures, bulletproofs, Dandelion relay, “scriptless scripting,” and atomic swaps. All these greatly increase the probability of the Grin blockchain being able to address a multitude of use cases that have not been possible with the existing set of blockchains. At the very least, Grin coin may actually fulfill the promise of digital cash.

2018-10-11 | Full Review

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Grin is mostly a feature. That feature can be added/accessed via other cryptocurrencies without a new token. I think it's unlikely base protocols with new features can survive long-term.

Grin's reason to be is mostly mimblewimble, which is a feature, which I'm skeptical is enough to support long-term value for a base protocol cryptoasset.

Ari Paul, Co-founder and CIO of BlockTower Capital

2019-02-08 | Full Review

Privacy coin comparison

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